CA Dream Network

Please click here to visit the CA Dream Network website

The California Dream Network founded in 2003 as a project of CHIRLA is a statewide network of existing and emerging college campus organizations who actively address undocumented student issues and who work to create broader social change around immigration reform and access to higher education. The CA Dream Network’s work is carried out through:

  • College campus organizing
  • Statewide conference calls
  • Regional summits
  • Annual statewide conference

Our Mission:

Serve as a base for the mobilization and politicization or young people in the larger social movement for equal access to education, immigration reform, and social justice.

Purpose: 

The network seeks to serve as a primary source for innovating ideas and action to ameliorate the plight of undocumented students. It seeks to serve as the central meeting ground for existing and emerging groups who actively address undocumented student issues and who work to create broader social change around immigration reform and access to higher education.

Structure:

The California Dream Network is divided into three regions: Northern, Central, and Southern. The Steering Committee, which is comprised of 14 students who are elected at every statewide retreat, serve until the next statewide retreat and help guide the network in a statewide campaign to mobilize and garner political support for the passage of the DREAM Act or CA Dream Act. Steering members represent the three different regions as follows: 

  • Northern Region ( 3 Steering Members )
  • Central Region ( 6 Steering Members )
  • Southern Region ( 5 Steering Members

Click here to see Steering Members Profiles.

Each AB 540 student support group may elect one or two students from its own group to serve as CDN campus representative(s). These students participate in monthly statewide conference calls and report back to their campuses on the content of the calls; help organize and mobilize for statewide and local actions; and most importantly serve as role models to undocumented students in their communities. 

Special committees are also created to empower and encourage members to assume leadership roles such as in the Direct Action and Fundraising Committees.